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**If you're interested in submitting a guest blog to eePRO, please get in touch with the moderator(s) of the group(s) relevant to your content, they can post your blog pending review.**

A person holding a drill leans into a tree in a snowy forest
Blog

Dr. Jeremy Solin shares how he connected to the land and made it his business. We make meaning by seeking associations with the land. Aldo Leopold saw it this way: "When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect." When we see things through the eyes of what we love, to protect it and sustain it. We then have a model that asks us to act in a way that represents our love for the earth, to protect it, and to pass it along to the next generation.

Students testing water from local aquatic ecosystems
Testing water from local aquatic ecosystems. Photo credit: Angela Darveau
Blog
Moderator Endorsed: Global EE

As environmental educators, it can be easy to focus on problems like climate change, deforestation, and extinction, but that can have negative impacts on young generations. Rather than inspiring them to care more, this can sometimes have the opposite affect by causing young people to feel helpless to make change. We can combat this by fostering a sense of place in our students, focusing on local ecosystems, and encouraging them to see nature all around them. A focus on local solutions gives us a chance to see how just a few people can make a big difference. We can inspire others by emphasizing tangible actions that they can personally take, since it always feels better to do something about the problems you see. Small adjustments to these lessons may be all it takes to change someone’s outlook!

A young child wearing a red backpack and holding a stuffed toy bear, stands on a ridge and looks out at some hills on a foggy day
Blog
Moderator Endorsed: Global EE

The "culture of danger," as in child-proofing homes, daycare facilities, and outside play areas, has touched every aspect of early childhood education. How can one go about playing in backyards and play areas when one lives near bears, moose, and coyotes? It is all about acquiring knowledge of wildlife behavior and discovering the special capabilities of very young children.

A photo of a family standing in front of a table, reading a display about yellow perch and aquaculture in Ohio.
Tabletop display materials will be used at outreach events such as here at the Ohio Fish and Shrimp Festival in September 2022. Photo credit: Nicole Wright
Blog
Moderator Endorsed: Global EE

Dive into the story of an Ohioan partnership linking people and small businesses across the state through education, and follow the yellow perch's journey from source to plate in the latest Harvest Stories.

A group of kids huddle around a person kneeling to hold a plastic water bottle out
Photo credit: Holly Peterson/Westgate Community School
Blog
Moderator Endorsed: Global EE

After college, I became disheartened that environmental education was not the career path that I wanted to continue. Every position I saw offered low wages, part-time, or volunteer work. Then I found Westgate Community School (WCS), a K–12 charter school unlike any other. Environmental Education and Service Learning are just two pieces of Westgate’s whole child education that I lead as the Environmental Education Coordinator. I take care of goats, chickens, barn cats, and a snake daily. I teach topics about all things environmental. I am here to talk about my work at Westgate and explain why we must integrate environmental education into our public school systems.

Blog
Moderator Endorsed: Global EE

NAAEE is in the early stages of developing a set of guidelines focusing on climate change education and climate justice as part of the Guidelines for Excellence series. We envision that this set of guidelines will provide a set of recommendations for developing and implementing community-driven, climate education that is centered on climate justice and empowers climate action. Your participation is important.

NAAEE Affiliate Network Logo
Blog

Affiliate leaders are needed to help inform a new Affiliate Fund at NAAEE. We anticipate engaging approximately 8 individuals, including Affiliate leaders to advise the design of an RFP and serve as reviewers for funding requests.

Two women smile at the camera while each holding a mason jar filled with rocks, soil, and green vegetation.
During the Worldwide Teach-In last March, students created terrariums after learning about the environmental benefits of gardening and growing food. Photo credit: Kerry Hustwit / Neumann University
Blog
Moderator Endorsed: Global EE
Moderator Endorsed: K-12 EE

What's the Worldwide Teach-In? Learn about a bottom-up educational event led by educators and community members.